Kentucky REALTOR® News

Kentucky Home Sales Rebound in August 2018
October 8, 2018
Kentucky Home Sales Rebound in August 2018


Kentucky home sales followed the national trend by rising in August and reaching 5,485 transactions.  This is a 4.3 percent increase over August 2017 and the second highest monthly sales for the state since June 2017. For the year, home sales are trailing 2017 by just 1.02 percent, with 35,838 transactions through the first eight months of the year (36,208 sales were recorded in the same period for 2017).

 

                              

 

Nationally, existing home sales remained steady in August after four straight months of decline, according to the National Association of REALTORS® (NAR).  NAR Chief Economist Lawrence Yun says the decline in existing home sales appears to have hit a plateau with robust regional sales.  “With inventory stabilizing and modestly rising, buyers appear ready to step back into the market”.

 

Home prices in Kentucky rebounded in August by 3.2 percent to a median price of $134,440 after a decrease in July and are up from $130,220 for August 2017.  Nationally, median home prices rose 4.6 percent from August 2017.  The U.S. median home price in August was $264,800, roughly twice that of Kentucky’s.               

 

Kentucky’s housing inventory fell from 3.82 months in July to a 3.56 month supply in August 2018 and is down 7.3 percent from August 2017.   Nationally, housing inventory at the end of August remained unchanged from July and is at a 4.3 month supply.

 

In July, the number of days properties stayed on the market had hit a record low of 95 days, but in August rose to 104 days.  Still, the time properties stay on the market in Kentucky is down 11.9% from August of 2017 and year-to-date, is down 9 percent.  Nationally, the time properties typically stayed on the market rose slightly, but is at just 29 days. Across the country, 52 percent of homes were on the market for less than one month.

 

“Nationally, surveys show that half of all Americans strongly believe now is a good time to sell their home, but their belief that now is a good time to buy one is now 5 percent lower than the previous quarter” said Steve Cline, President of Kentucky REALTORS®. “ We know that the Kentucky and national economies are booming, but many people are fearful of selling their home and not being able to find a replacement quickly or that they can afford,” Cline said. 

 

Kentucky REALTORS® is one of the largest and most influential associations in Kentucky. Founded in 1922, Kentucky REALTORS® represents more than 11,000 REALTORS® who are involved in all aspects of real estate, including residential and commercial real estate brokers, sales agents, developers, builders, property managers, office managers, appraisers and auctioneers.
 

To view housing statistics for the state, as reported to Kentucky REALTORS®, visit housingstats.kyrealtors.com.

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Kentucky home sales inch up for the second time in 2018
August 30, 2018
Days on market reach lowest on record for the state


Home sales rose in July for only the second time this year, reaching 5,072 transactions, a 1.4 percent increase over the 5,000 sold in July 2017. For the year, home sales are trailing 2017 by almost 2 percent, with 30,354 transactions through the first seven months of the year (30,950 sales were recorded in the same period for 2017).

 

Nationally, home sales have fallen for five straight months, decreasing less than one percent from June 2018 to July 2018, but are 1.5 percent below a year ago. The forecast from Lawrence Yun, NAR chief economist, is that home sales may decrease one percent for 2018 and then rise 2 percent in 2019. Across the state, total home sales may end lower than in 2017, however, this year should stand as the second highest on record.

 

“The market has been hard to predict in 2018,” said Steve Cline, president of Kentucky REALTORS®. “We are seeing ups and downs in overall sales and the trends aren’t following the national patterns. The dynamics at play are low inventory and mortgage rates, coupled with a strong economy and high housing demand, making it tough to gauge what will happen from month to month.”  

 

Home prices in Kentucky fell in July by 4.8 percent to a median of $133,814, down from $140,514 in 2017. This was the first year-over-year price drop since May 2017. Nationally, median home prices were up 4.5 percent to $269,600, which is double the state’s median price.

 

Kentucky’s housing inventory slipped in July year-over-year after seeing the first annual increase last month. The 3.82 months of supply in July was down 2.1 percent versus July 2017, but was more than the 3.47 months of supply available in June. For the year, inventory is down 2.6 percent versus the same period in 2017, showing 4.14 months over the first seven months of the year. Nationally, housing inventory remained at a 4.3-month supply.

 

"Properties priced correctly are being scooped up fast,” said Cline. “The market is still hot in most areas of the state, making it difficult for would-be buyers to move on a house before it’s gone.”

 

In fact, July saw a 15.9 percent decline in the amount of time properties stayed on the market. At 95 days, this is the first month on record that homes have averaged fewer than 100 days on the market in Kentucky. Nationally, properties typically stayed on the market for 27 days in July, a 10 percent drop from a year prior. Across the country, 55 percent of homes were on the market for less than one month.

 

“Because Kentucky has a low cost of ownership, many people are looking to purchase instead of rent,” continued Cline. “With a lower than usual supply of homes on the market, demand has been pushed higher and in July, it seems lower priced homes outside the metro areas made up the bulk of transactions as an overall price decline was reflected across the state.”

 

Median prices were up in the three largest areas of the state – Louisville, Lexington and Northern Kentucky.

 

Looking forward, Yun has said that rising inventory levels, if new home construction can finally start picking up, would help slow price appreciation, help aspiring first-time buyers and be good for the long-term health of the nation’s housing market.

 

Kentucky REALTORS® is one of the largest and most influential associations in Kentucky. Founded in 1922, Kentucky REALTORS® represents more than 11,000 REALTORS® who are involved in all aspects of real estate, including residential and commercial real estate brokers, sales agents, developers, builders, property managers, office managers, appraisers and auctioneers.
 

To view housing statistics for the state, as reported to Kentucky REALTORS®, visit housingstats.kyrealtors.com.

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Kentucky's unemployment report for July 2018 released
August 20, 2018

Kentucky’s seasonally adjusted preliminary July 2018 unemployment rate was 4.3 percent, according to the Kentucky Center for Statistics (KYSTATS), an agency of the Kentucky Education and Workforce Development Cabinet. The unemployment rate for July 2018 was up from the 4.2 percent reported for June 2018.

The preliminary July 2018 jobless rate was down 0.7 percentage points from the 5 percent recorded for the state in July 2017.

The U.S. seasonally adjusted jobless rate for July 2018 was 3.9 percent, down 0.1 percentage point from the 4 percent reported for June 2018, according to the U.S. Department of Labor. Read More

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Home sales experiencing a decline in Kentucky
August 8, 2018

Prices and inventory on the rise throughout the state

 

June home sales were at the lowest level for the month since 2014, with the number of transactions decreasing 5.4 percent compared to a year ago (5,504 in 2017 versus 5,207 in 2018). Even with the decline, total home sales for the first half of 2018 are still on track to be the second highest ever for Kentucky. Through June, home sales reached 25,253, only 2.7 percent (or 697 total homes) below the same period in 2017 when 25,950 homes sales were recorded.

 

Across the country, sales were down slightly for the month, with the National Association of REALTORS® (NAR) reporting a decrease of 2.2 percent when compared to June 2017.

 

Lawrence Yun, NAR chief economist, said closings, on the national front, fell on an annual basis for the fourth straight month as there continues to be a mismatch between the growing homebuyer demand in most of the country in relation to the actual pace of home sales, which are declining. He continued by saying the root cause is without a doubt the severe housing shortage with available properties going under contract very fast. This dynamic is, in turn, keeping home price growth elevated, pricing out would-be buyers and ultimately slowing sales.

 

The state’s housing inventory rose year-over-year for the first time in 2018, with 3.47 months of supply in June, slightly higher than it was in May 2018 and in June 2017. For the year, however, inventory is down 2.6 percent versus the same period in 2017. Nationally, housing inventory is 0.5 percent above a year ago, which is the first year-over-year increase since June 2015. Inventory levels across the U.S. stand at a 4.3 month supply.

 

“Properties are not staying around on the market very long,” said Steve Cline, the 2018 president of Kentucky REALTORS®. “Even though the inventory shortage didn’t show a statistical decline in Kentucky, homebuyer demand continues to strengthen in many markets and there just aren’t enough homes currently available to satisfy the demand, especially in the more affordable price ranges.”

 

This is evident when looking at the days on market (DOM), which shows how many days a home has been actively listed for sale. In Kentucky, days on market has dropped to just under 115 days for the first six months of the year, down 6.5 percent over 2017 when it was at 123 days. In June, DOM dropped to 107 days, from 115 in June 2017, a decrease of 7 percent. On the national level, the amount of time a property stayed on the market is surprisingly low, with NAR reporting 26 days in June, down from 28 days a year ago. Fifty-eight percent on homes sold in June across the country were on the market less than a month.

 

“The current level of homes available in Kentucky is far from what’s needed to satisfy demand levels,” added Cline. “And given the fact that the growing economy is bringing more potential buyers into the market and new home construction is still below where it needs to be, this demand is driving up prices in many parts of the state.”

 

The state’s median home price jumped to $144,271 in June, an 8 percent increase over June 2017 and 7.8 percent over the previous month. June marked only the second month (July 2017) where the median price exceeded the $140K threshold. For the year, the median home price increased to $131,433, up 6.4 percent from the first six months in 2017 when prices were $123,497. Nationally, the median home price in June reached $276,900, an all-time high, and up 5.2 percent from the same time last year when prices were $263,300. June marked the 76th straight month of year-over-year gains.

 

“Even with the upward momentum of prices for homes in Kentucky, they are still affordable when compared to the national picture,” said Cline. “In addition, reports are showing that a national trend of increasing supply may be playing out and if this proves to be true, prospective buyers will begin to see more choices and a softer price growth as we move forward.”

 

Kentucky REALTORS® is one of the largest and most influential associations in Kentucky. Founded in 1922, Kentucky REALTORS® represents more than 11,000 REALTORS® who are involved in all aspects of real estate, including residential and commercial real estate brokers, sales agents, developers, builders, property managers, office managers, appraisers and auctioneers.
 

To view housing statistics for the state, as reported to Kentucky REALTORS®, visit housingstats.kyrealtors.com.

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CRS: Zero to Sixty Home Sales a Year
August 1, 2018

Hosted by Kentucky REALTOR® Institute

​Instructor: Dale Carlton
Monday, September 24
The Galt House, Louisville, KY
8:30am - 5pm (registration opens at 7:30am)

CREDIT: 

8 CRS Hours
8 GRI Elective Hours
6 CE Elective Hours
6 PLE Elective Hours

REGISTER HERE

Convention attendees receive a discount and can sign up for this course when registering for the event.

Course Description:​

Do you dream of selling 60 homes or more per year, but aren't sure where to begin?  Whether you are looking to jumpstart your business or just starting out, the RRC One Day Course, Zero to 60 Home Sales a Year (and Beyond) will help you accelerate your home sales and create a continuous flow of business. Learn new marketing methods that will help you position yourself as the REALTOR® of choice in your area.  

Upon the successful completion of this course, you will be able to:

  • Develop an effective plan to sell 60 homes (or more) a year
  • Create a continuous stream of referrals
  • Build an effective team to support your plan
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Homes sold in Kentucky drop in May after a record breaking April
July 3, 2018
Sold total takes a hit but total volume is still on record breaking pace


Kentucky’s housing market followed the national scene in May, with home sales decreasing 6.2 percent for the month compared to a year ago. Even with the decline, total home sales were the second highest ever for the month, reaching 5,057, versus 5,395 in May 2016. Year-to-date, homes sales are down 2 percent with only 410 more homes sold across Kentucky in the first 5 months of 2016 than this year.

 

“The decline in real estate transactions across the state are a result of the low supply in the first-time buyer and move up markets,” said Steve Cline, 2018 president of Kentucky REALTORS®. “Inventory levels in Kentucky are over three percent lower now than they were this time last year and the fact prices are increasing may be keeping buyers on the sidelines until the perfect home hits the market.”

 

Housing inventory through May is down 3.3 percent, reaching 4.34 months compared to 4.49 months in 2016. May’s housing stock is flat compared to last year, but the same issues of lack of inventory were still in play in 2016 as they are today.

 

Homes are moving quickly this year, as days on market continue to decrease, reaching 100 days in May 2018 versus 124 days in May 2016, a decrease of almost 20 percent. For the year, days on market dropped just over 7 percent, reaching 116 days compared to 125 last year.

 

“With the limited number of homes on the market, buyers who are qualified and ready to buy, are finding a home to purchase and moving quick so they don’t miss the chance to own a home,” says Cline. “The economy is stable and interest rates are still low. Getting in the market now makes sense because conditions are right for housing as a whole. That may change in the future as prices are rising, but in Kentucky, affordability is still much better than most parts of the country.”

 

In fact, new findings from the National Association of REALTORS® (NAR) show that 75 percent of the U.S. population believe that now is a good time to sell a house, while 68 percent think it is a good time to buy. According to NAR’s second quarter Housing Opportunities and Market Experience (HOME) survey, a majority of consumers believe prices have and will continue to increase and that homeownership strengthens our nation’s communities.

 

NAR Chief Economist Lawrence Yun, in response to the survey that inventory remains the driving force in real estate, affecting everything for rising prices to household formation. He continued by saying that improving supply conditions is critical to improving buyer optimism and helping to remove some of the barriers holding back potential first-time buyers. One encouraging sign has been the increase in new home construction to a 10-year high, which may help would-be buyers find a home.

 

Home prices in Kentucky continued to rise in May, reaching a median of $133,856, up 2.5 percent from May 2016 when prices were $130,569. For the year, Kentucky’s median was up just over 6 percent to $128,845 versus the 2016 median of $121,471. The in-state median for May was the fifth highest month ever recorded and the highest ever for May. Nationally, the median home price topped $264,000, an all-time high and up almost 5 percent from May 2017 when it reached just over $252,000.

 

“Across the country, it is being predicted that home sales may fall less than half of a percent, with prices gaining around 5 percent for the year,” said Cline. “In Kentucky, we may see a similar trend which would make 2018 the second-best year on record for home sales and the highest for prices. If we continue to have a vibrant economy, real estate should remain strong.”

 

Kentucky REALTORS® is one of the largest and most influential associations in Kentucky. Founded in 1922, Kentucky REALTORS® represents more than 11,000 REALTORS® who are involved in all aspects of real estate, including residential and commercial real estate brokers, sales agents, developers, builders, property managers, office managers, appraisers and auctioneers.
 

To view housing statistics for the state, as reported to Kentucky REALTORS®, visit housingstats.kyrealtors.com.

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Call for Action: Reauthorize the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP)
June 20, 2018

Call For Action -

The National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) will expire on July 31, denying necessary insurance coverage to homeowners and buyers in more than 20,000 communities nationwide. Congress must act now to reform and extend the NFIP. 

As the leading advocate for private property rights and housing issues, NAR supports long-term reauthorization and reform of the National Flood Insurance Program before it expires on July 31.

America’s 1.3 million REALTORS value the NFIP as a critical tool to help protect homeowners and ensure access to affordable flood insurance. In fact, as flood insurance is required for a mortgage across 22,000 communities in America, a prolonged lapse in authority could jeopardize the sale of up to 40,000 homes per month in the United States.

While every day brings us closer to NFIP expiration, the urgency of its reauthorization is not new to Congress or anyone reliant upon the flood insurance program. 


CLICK HERE TO TAKE ACTION
 

BONUS:

KYR is offering the chance to win a FREE registration to the KYR Annual Convention in Louisville this September, valued at $139. Any member who participates in this CFA will automatically be entered to win, and the winner’s name will be drawn at random at the conclusion of the CFA. Also, you can help your board win too. KYR is offering $100 gift cards in each of the board categories (small, medium, and large) with the greatest member participation in the CFA.

DID YOU KNOW:
  • Over the last 40 years, Kentucky experienced over $328 million in paid out damages for flooding. This included 23,898 total losses.
  • Kentucky has almost 21,000 homes that maintain flood insurance and owners pay almost $20 million in premiums. 
  • Kentucky home owners have over $3.5 billion in flood insurance coverage on properties across the state.
  • Since 2008, NFIP has been extended 23 times and shut down for a combined period of 2 months.
  • More than 5 million Americans in 22,000 communities nationwide rely on the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP). 
  • Floods are not just coastal issues. In fact, floods accounted for 73% of federal disaster declarations between 2008 and 2017. 
Why renew NFIP?

Flood insurance isn’t just for coastal properties - inland areas flood, too. And if the NFIP lapses, up to 40,000 transactions per month could be affected. 

The National Association of REALTORS® supports several revisions to the program: 

  • Reauthorizing and gradually strengthening the NFIP so it’s sustainable over the long run
  • Encouraging the development of private market options to offer comparable flood insurance coverage at lower cost than NFIP
  • Providing federal assistance to high-risk property owners, including guaranteed loans, grants, and buyouts to build to higher standards and keep insurance rates affordable
  • Providing fair flood insurance rates that better reflect the property’s flood risk
  • Improving flood map accuracy so fewer property owners have to file expensive appeals

 

In addition to participating  in the Call for Action, we are asking for your help in promoting this to other members. 

 Help Kentucky reach a 20% response rate so our voice is heard on this important issue
 

  • Click here for the NFIP Resource page
  • Click here for the CFA Toolkit
  • Click here for the REALTOR Action Center Facebook page that includes shareable graphics and information
  • Click here for communication materials and talking points
  • Click here to find out how Kentucky is doing compared to other states
  • Click here to find out how your local association is doing compared to others in Kentucky


Thanks for all you do for the industry and sign up for REALTOR Party mobile alerts:
Sign up for REALTOR Party Mobile Alerts and take action on important issues facing real estate. Mobile alerts come to your mobile phone and only take a second to respond. These matter to legislators when dealing with issues like MID, flood insurance and more. Text REALTORS to 30644.

Call For Action -

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Real estate sales in Kentucky see first increase in 2018
June 5, 2018

April's volume is the highest ever for the month


In a reversal of course and going against the national trend, Kentucky’s housing sales were up in April for the first time in 2018 and the first increase since October 2017.

 

Real estate sales reached 4,545, which is a 7.4 percent increase over April 2017 and an all-time high for the month. Year-to-date, homes sold are still down less than 1 percent over last year with only 79 less transactions in the first four months of 2018 compared to the same period in 2017.

 

“We are now in the prime home buying and selling season,” said Steve Cline, 2018 president of Kentucky REALTORS®. “In fact, April was the first increase in sales the state has seen since October 2017. Inventory issues have really limited the ability for buyers to make a move, but pent up demand seems to be driving the market. This month showed a significant decrease in days on market and inventory which means homes aren’t staying on the market very long. The next few months will provide a better outlook on where Kentucky may land for the year in real estate.”

 

Going into the busy real estate period, days on market dropped 3.4 percent to 115 days in April from 119 last year and down from 120 days in March. Inventory across the state fell almost 10 percent from a year ago, with only 3.8 months of inventory on hand. There was a slight decline in housing inventory to this point in the year, with 3.8 months of supply for March, a decrease of 5 percent over last year and down 2.1 percent to 4.7 months, for the quarter. Year-to-date, days on market is down 4 percent compared to 2017 and inventory is down 3.6 percent, reaching 4.57 months overall.

 

Nationally, home sales slid 1.4 percent in April, but home prices were up 5.3 percent over a year ago. Properties typically stayed on the market for 26 days in April, which is down from 30 days from two months ago and 29 days a year ago. Fifty-seven percent of homes sold in April were on the market for less than a month. Total housing inventory at the end of April increased 9.8 percent, but is still 6.3 percent lower than a year ago.

 

Lawrence Yun, NAR chief economist, says that the homes available for sale are going under contract at a rapid pace. Since NAR began tracking this data in May 2011, the median days a listing was on the market was at an all-time low in April, and the share of homes sold in less than a month was at an all-time high.

Prices in Kentucky rose 7 percent year over year, reaching a median of $136,250 in April, making it the highest ever recorded for that month and the third highest median price ever in Kentucky. April’s median price was 3 percent higher than the previous month in March. Year to date, the median home price of $127,659 is 7 percent higher than it was at this time in 2017, putting it on pace to break another annual record. Total sales volume was another April record, reaching over $880 million, an increase of more than 14.6 percent over the $768 million sold in April 2016, the previous record for the month.

 

“Throughout the state, the housing market is still very hot as more and more people are wanting to take advantage of Kentucky’s affordable housing prices while interest rates are still low,” said Cline. “The national picture shows a cooling off of pending sales, but the south, which includes Kentucky, is still higher now than it was this time last year. From what I am seeing across the state, demand for homeownership is very robust and will continue that trend for some time.”

 

Kentucky REALTORS® is one of the largest and most influential associations in Kentucky. Founded in 1922, Kentucky REALTORS® represents more than 10,800 REALTORS® who are involved in all aspects of real estate, including residential and commercial real estate brokers, sales agents, developers, builders, property managers, office managers, appraisers and auctioneers.
 

To view housing statistics for the state, as reported to Kentucky REALTORS®, visit housingstats.kyrealtors.com.

 

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Kentucky tourism industry generates over $15 billion in 2017
May 11, 2018

The economic impact of Kentucky’s tourism industry has grown to more than $15 billion in 2017, Department of Tourism Commissioner Kristen Branscum announced recently. All nine of the state’s tourism regions registered gains again in 2017.

“The tourism industry is a driving force for Kentucky’s economy and the 2017 economic impact numbers reinforce this,” Branscum said. “We look at growth in our state in terms of investment and the impact numbers prove that visitors are investing their money and time into Kentucky.”

Kentucky’s tourism industry generated over $15 billion in economic impact during 2017, an increase of 3.8 percent over the previous year. The industry also supported over 195,000 jobs. Kentucky tourism generated more than $1.5 billion in tax revenue, with $202 million going directly to local communities.

The Kentucky Department of Tourism continues to build upon Kentucky’s signature tourism industries of horses, bourbon, music, arts, outdoors and culinary to reach new audiences and position Kentucky as a top-tier travel destination for visitors internationally and domestically.

Click here to view the full economic impact report

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Home sales decline, but prices remain strong in Kentucky
May 10, 2018
Lack of inventory continues to impact the market


Home sales in Kentucky did not follow the national trend in March, as transactions in the state were down 6.8 percent for the month compared to March 2017 (4,576 in 2017 versus 4,262 in 2018). Nationally, sales rose 1.1 percent. Even with the drop of 314 total sales, March 2018 was still the second highest on record, just edging out March 2006 when 4,106 homes were sold. Total homes sold for the month were up 36 percent over the previous month.

 

For the first quarter of the year, sales ended down 3.7 percent, with 10,419 homes sold in 2018 compared to 10,821 homes sold in the first three months of 2017, a difference of 402 transactions.

 

“The housing market is still really strong,” said Steve Cline, 2018 president of Kentucky REALTORS® (KYR). “Last year was a record breaking year in homes sold and home prices. This year, we had to endure unseasonably cold weather through the latter part of the quarter, which may have negatively affected the market. The spring and early summer months will be telling as to how the rest of 2018 will look.”

 

Lawrence Yun, NAR chief economist, says that while the healthy economy is generating sustained interest in buying a home this spring, sales are lagging levels from one year ago due to low supply and home prices keep climbing above what some would-be buyers can afford. On the national level, median home prices are north of $250,000, however, that is not the case in Kentucky.

 

Home prices in the state reached a median of $132,290 in March, an 11.5 percent increase over March 2017 ($118,698) and 10.7 percent over the previous month ($119,523). March’s median price is the fifth highest on record, but is still just over half of the median for the country.

 

The months ahead are traditionally the peak for home sales and Kentucky has seen a slight decline in housing inventory to this point in the year, with 3.8 months of supply for March - a decrease of 5 percent over last year and down 2.1 percent, to 4.7 months, for the quarter.

 

Because of the tight supply, days on market also saw a decline, falling to 120 days in March which is down 4.8 percent over last March. For the quarter, homes closed 4 days faster, hitting 122 days in 2018.

 

“I’m optimistic about the real estate market because we have a strong economy,” said Cline. “We are at a place where both state and national unemployment is near record lows and the environment is stable for home purchases. Certainly, we could use more inventory to meet demand as activity is picking up with the warmer weather, but overall it should be another strong year.”

 

Nationally, the momentum is swinging toward home ownership. In 2017, the homeownership rate rose for the first time in 13 years and the first quarter of 2018 marked the fifth consecutive quarter where the homeownership rate rose from the prior year, jumping almost 1 percent to 64.3 percent. This is being caused by a variety of factors. Not only is the economy strong, loosening credit standards, rising rents, continued low mortgage rates and a demographic shift where the large millennial generation is entering its prime home buying stage are contributing factors.

 

“In order to keep buyers in the market, and home prices affordable, we need a healthy supply of homes to meet the demand,” said Cline. “To do this, home construction will need to steadily increase and sellers who want to move up will need to list their properties. As this continues to happen, we should see a more balanced market going forward.”

 

Kentucky REALTORS® is one of the largest and most influential associations in Kentucky. Founded in 1922, Kentucky REALTORS® represents more than 10,800 REALTORS® who are involved in all aspects of real estate, including residential and commercial real estate brokers, sales agents, developers, builders, property managers, office managers, appraisers and auctioneers.
 

To view housing statistics for the state, as reported to Kentucky REALTORS®, visit housingstats.kyrealtors.com.

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